ZULU WOMEN OF HOPE – SPEAKING HOPE IN DESPAIR

Posted in News

Doris* (not her real name) decided to commit suicide after discovering she was HIV positive. She lost hope in any future as the solution required dramatic change! What would the future even look like? How could she live a normal life? At this point, Doris began listening to TWR’s Women of Hope programme in the language of her heart - Zulu.

IMG 20180813 WA0021 Zulu AudibiblesThrough practical wisdom and spiritual discipleship, the Women of Hope programmes have saved, inspired and grown many listeners around the world. Women have even formed listener groups around the programme. During these sessions, parenting and family-oriented programmes in the Zulu language are played on audio players and the women discuss how to apply the Bible-based lessons to their lives.

One of the TWR Women of Hope facilitators visited Doris during her time of crisis. She had no idea that Doris was contemplating suicide. Doris gave her life to the Lord and received an audio Bible. She now attends prayer meetings. Doris’ life-changing story has encouraged the care supporters in her listener group and also encouraged prayer groups leaders in other groups to keep going.

Doris is one of millions of women throughout the world today who are facing life challenges. They have lost hope. She learnt that not only is the world a dark and dangerous place for countless women, but the spiritual darkness in which these women live in is even greater than their physical plight. She knew that she had an unshakeable burden to help suffering women all over the world.

Zulu is the most widely spoken home language in South Africa (24% of the population), understood by over 50% of its population. It became one of South Africa's 11 official languages in 1994. According to ethnologue.com, it is the second most widely spoken of the Bantu languages, after Swahili.

THE MINISTRY OF ZULU TWR WOMEN OF HOPE

“We have a wide range of Zulu speaking people in South Africa and people who understand the language in Zimbabwe and Eswatini,” says TWR Women of Hope Regional Coordinator for East and Southern Africa, Philile Bhengu. She adds that they have ethnic groups of Nguni in Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia. “Women and girls benefit as they listen to TWR Women of Hope programmes. Zulu is one of the 70-plus languages into which the programme is translated. They’re making a spiritual difference in the lives of countless women throughout South Africa – and across the world. Zulu WOH programmes are available on TWR360.org and in audio players, mainly used in kwa-Zulu Natal, Mpumalanga and Gauteng provinces in South-Africa” she adds.

TWR Women of Hope programmes can be heard on audio players within listener groups. After the programme is played, women discuss how to apply the Bible-based lessons to their lives.

A listener to Women of Hope from KZN writes:

Women of Hope, we are excited about women’s programmes. We don't even want you to change the past programmes, because we receive an inspiration together with our families. I was shocked to learn about different kinds of abuse, I had no idea about such horrible behaviours.

Thank you, Women of Hope.